Leaders across the continent have weighed in on the NAFTA renegotiations ahead of the August 16 talks. On everything from communication strategies to the potential economic impact, to the effect on jobs, a lot has been said.

How close have you been following discussions? See if you remember ‘who said what’ by taking this quiz (answers at the bottom): 

1. “I don’t think there’s anything wrong with Canada waiting in the weeds and watching and observing for now. Because we now know what the Americans’ starting point is.”

  • Rona Ambrose
  • Stephen Poloz
  • Chrystia Freeland
  • Bill Morneau

2. “The government has a responsibility to communicate to Canadians what its overarching objectives are. We don’t have to divulge all our negotiation tactics of course, and there’s no need to do that. But we’ve got to show that we are coming in here strong."

  • Paul Martin
  • Joe Oliver
  • Justin Trudeau
  • Derek Burney

3. “We will be providing advice to the government in terms of the negotiations and thinking about a variety of sectors from a variety of perspectives, and just trying to make sure we get the very best deal we can.”

  • Bill Downe
  • Chrystia Freeland
  • David MacNaughton
  • Linda Hasenfratz

4. “This is not a negotiation in which the Americans present Canada and Mexico with a list of unilateral concessions. This should be a negotiation about mutual benefit for all three parties – and at a minimum, I think that that’s a message Canada, as well as Mexico, should be conveying.”

  • Jean Chretien
  • Derek Burney
  • Andrew Scheer
  • Justin Trudeau

5. "I'm not seeing where there's a huge advantage to laying out a, 'we don't agree with this, we do agree with this, we have this objective,' because that puts us in a position where we've started with some information that might not be where we want to start."  

  • Justin Trudeau
  • David MacNaughton
  • Bill Morneau
  • Stephen Poloz

6. “A fair dispute resolution system is essential for any trade deal that Canada signs on to and we expect that that will continue to be the case in any renegotiated NAFTA, that we will continue to have a fair dispute resolution system."

  • Rachel Notley
  • Brad Wall
  • Justin Trudeau
  • Bill Morneau

7. “Trade is the lifeblood of the Canadian economy. We need to know what’s going to happen to NAFTA one way or the other; the uncertainty is holding things back, not necessarily the details.”

  • David MacNaughton
  • Rachel Notley
  • Stephen Poloz
  • David Rosenberg

8. "As a starting point for negotiations, we should build on what has worked in NAFTA and change and improve what has not. If renegotiations result in a fairer deal for American workers there is value in making the transition to a modernized NAFTA as seamless as possible."

  • Donald Trump
  • Robert Lighthizer
  • Wilbur Ross
  • Mike Pence

9. “It is an asset to have the three partners of NAFTA. We can still build a very fair agreement so that we can increase and strengthen competitiveness between our two nations.”

  • Justin Trudeau
  • Enrique Peña Nieto
  • Chrystia Freeland
  • Joe Oliver

10. “That is a separate thing and they are fine and we have had a very fair relationship with Canada. It has been much more balanced and much more fair. So we do not have to worry about Canada, we do not even think about them.”

  • Donald Trump
  • Enrique Pena Nieto
  • Mike Pence
  • Robert Lighthizer 

 

Freeland maps out Canada’s 6 key objectives for NAFTA renegotiations

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland outlined Canada’s key priorities for upcoming NAFTA renegotiations on Monday. BNN’s Jameson Berkow reports.

Answer Key: 1. Rona Ambrose 2. Joe Oliver 3. Linda Hasenfratz 4. Derek Burney 5. Bill Morneau 6. Justin Trudeau 7. Stephen Poloz 8. Robert Lighthizer 9. Enrique Peña Nieto 10. Donald Trump